YAMAHA 11.1/4″ x 14 PITCH PROPELLER

R0

3 Blade Yamaha aluminium propeller.
Suitable for models: FS60HP (4 Stroke)

SKU: 15318

Description

– Cupped trailing edge to better grab and hold water, dramatically enhancing the performance and efficiency.
– Rubber cushion hub system.
– Exchangeable hub kit system is also available for Mercury D & E class propellers and Honda D class propellers.
– Flared hub design keeps exhaust from causing speed robbing ventilation blow outs.
– Precision balanced blades significantly reduce vibration
– High gloss powder coating protects aluminium, minimizes speed loss from drag, reduces corrosion and looks great on any boat.
– High performance blade geometry, higher degree rake and progressive pitch design results in a better combination of top end speed and dead start acceleration.
– Optimal blade thickness, each blade is carefully engineered thin enough to maximize performance but thick enough to provide long lasting durability.

WHICH PROPELLER PITCH IS APPROPRIATE:

1. Check the RPM range recommended by the Outboard Motor Manufacturer in the manual.
2. Check the maximum RPM range by reading the instrument panel to determine the optimal pitch and speed.
3. If maximum RPM exceeds the recommended range, lower the RPM by using one level higher pitched propeller. Repeat this procedure to figure out the appropriate pitch propeller.
4. If maximum RMP is lower that the recommended range, raise the RPM by using one level lower pitch propeller. Repeat this procedure to figure out the appropriate pitch propeller.

Diagram to explain the pitch dimension of a propeller. The pitch is the theoretical distance a propeller would travel through water if there were no friction.

How to Measure Your Gear Case Size:
To accurately measure the diameter of your gear case, measure the area as marked in the image below. There is also a reference table attached below to assist in identifying the size of the gear case accurately.

 
Gear Case Sizing (Inch):
– 2 1/2
– 3
– 3 1/4
– 3 1/2
– 4 1/4
– 4 3/4
– 5 1/4
 

How to Count the Splines On Your Shaft:
The image below shows how prop shafts generally look, the marked area is referred to as the splines. To count these splines correctly it is recommended to mark the first spline you are counting and stop once you reach the marked spline again.